Japanese Cultural Workshop: Flower Arrangement in Jubako (Japanese Style Lunch Box)

Jubako(重箱) is a Japanese tiered food box, traditionally made with lacquer.  Japanese use Jubako to pack dishes for special occasions: New Year’s dish (Osechi) for New Year’s Day, Chirashi-sushi for the Girls’ festival (Hina Matsuri), homemade seasonal food for cherry blossom viewing (Hanami) and children’s sports day (Undoukai), etc.

Like a beautifully packed Japanese lunch box, a new trend in Japan is using a jubako in flower arranging.

We are happy to invite you to a hands-on workshop and experience a free-style flower arrangement in a jubako style box. You can use this arrangement for a holiday centerpiece or a one of a kind gift to someone special.  

To begin with, Ms. Mitsuko Omachi, an Ikenobo instructor in San Francisco, and her assistants will explain the very simple rules and fundamentals then demonstrate how to arrange flowers with useful tips. After her demonstration, participants will arrange with their inspiration.  You will have time during the workshop to complete your own arrangement in a small flat jubako style box to enjoy at home.

This event has limited space and registration is first come first served.  Please register early to ensure your spot in the workshop.  No previous experience in Ikebana or Japanese language is necessary to participate in this event.

Ms. Mitsuko Omachi
Ms. Mitsuko Omachi is a local Ikenobo sensei. Her career of flower arrangement with Ikenobo began in her twenties in Yokohama, Japan. After ten years of training in Japan, she moved to San Francisco and resumed her practice in 1980.  She has been an instructor of Ikenobo at Soko-ji since 1990.  Her works are seen at various occasions such as Cherry Blossom Festival, Tanabata Ikebana Exhibition, and Ikenobo Center Exhibition.

Location                                                                 
Japan Society of Northern California
500 Washington St., #300
San Francisco, CA 94111

Date & Time
Friday, December 4, 2015
5:45 – 6:00 PM  Check-in
6:00 – 7:30 PM  Workshop

Cost
$25  Japan Society Member
$30  Non-Member

 

Business Japanese Language Workshop: From Honorific Expressions to Business Writing

This workshop enables advanced Japanese learners to master useful expressions for business writing, which is imperative for formal communications in various business situations. To begin with, writing up such things as requirements on business activities, new plans, and ideas in a document form not only prevents us from overlooking critical issues, but it also helps us organize our thoughts in succinct and straightforward ways. Business letters furthermore help us reduce the risk of miscommunications with others. In this workshop, participants will be introduced to most of the areas associated with business writing. The workshop also provides intensive training in reading and writing business documents in Japanese.

Dr. Minami teaches the Business Japanese Course at SFSU through an academic year.  He is happy to share his expertise with JSNC language students and members.  Followed by last year’s “Business Japnaese Language Workshop”, Japanese business writing is the main focus this year in addition to honorific expressions.

Space is limited and registration is available on a first come first served basis.  Please register early to ensure your spot in the workshop. This session is recommended for anyone who retains Japanese skill level of JLPT N3 or above.

Contact classes@usajapan.org if you need assistance to gauge your language ability.

Dr. Masahiko Minami
Dr. Minami is Professor at San Francisco State University where he specializes in Japanese language and cross-cultural studies. He is also President of the Foreign Language Association of Northern California (FLANC) and coordinator for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test (Nihongo Nōryoku Shiken: JLPT) for Northern California. In addition, he was President of the Northern California Japanese Teachers’ Association (NCJTA). Dr. Minami, who received a PhD from Harvard University, is also a guest Professor at the National Institute for Japanese Language & Linguistics, Tokyo, Japan. Dr. Minami was the 2007 recipient of the Phi Beta Kappa Excellence in Teaching Award for Northern California.

Location:
Japan Society of Northern California
500 Washington St., #300
San Francisco, CA 94111

Date & Time
Friday, September 26th. 6:00-8:00 pm
Check in  5:45pm~

Cost
$18 for Japan Society Member
$28 for Non Member

To register, please click here.

The deadline to RSVP for this event is Wednesday, September 24th.
No refunds will be issued for cancellations received after this date.

 

 

Screening of HAFU | the mixed-race experience in Japan

We have sold out of tickets, but please add your name on our wait list (via Eventbrite).  We hope to do another screening later in the year and would like to let you know about it!

 

If you missed the screening this past March with Open Show, this is your chance to see it with us!  Director Megumi Nishikura will be available for Q&A!

With an ever increasing movement of people between places in this transnational age, there is a mounting number of mixed-race people in Japan, some visible others not. “Hafu” is the unfolding journey of discovery into the intricacies of mixed-race Japanese and their multicultural experience in modern day Japan. The film follows the lives of five “hafus”–the Japanese term for people who are half-Japanese–as they explore what it means to be multiracial and multicultural in a nation that once proudly proclaimed itself as the mono-ethnic nation. For some of these hafus Japan is the only home they know, for some living in Japan is an entirely new experience, and others are caught somewhere between two different worlds.

According to the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, one in forty-nine babies born in Japan today are born into families with one non-Japanese parent. This newly emerging minority in Japan is under-documented and under-explored in both literature and media. The feature-length HD documentary film, “Hafu – the mixed-race experience in Japan” seeks to open this increasingly important dialogue. The film explores race, diversity, multiculturalism, nationality, and identity within the mixed-race community of Japan. And through this exploration, it seeks to answer the following questions: What does it mean to be hafu?; What does it mean to be Japanese?; and ultimately, What does all of this mean for Japan?

Narrated by the hafus themselves, along with candid interviews and cinéma vérité footage, the viewer is guided through a myriad of hafu experiences that are influenced by upbringing, family relationships, education, and even physical appearance. As the film interweaves five unique life stories, audiences discover the depth and diversity of hafu personal identities.

Recommended for children ages 10+.


ONLINE REGISTRATION:

  • $8 for Children 12 years of age and under
  • $10 for Japan Society Members & Students (Please show ID at time of check-in)
  • $15 for Nonmembers
  • Online registration closes at 2:00 pm on Wednesday, May 21
  • No refunds after Wednesday, May 14
  • CLICK HERE TO REGISTER!

WALK-INS:

  • $20 per person (space permitting)

SCHEDULE:

  • 6:30 PM – 7:00 PM       Registration
  • 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM       Screening
  • 8:30 PM – 8:00 PM       Q&A with director Megumi Nishikura (via Skype)

 


 

COMMUNITY PARTNER:

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Open Show organizes live events worldwide where the public can see compelling work and interact directly with photographers, filmmakers and multimedia producers. Creators from amateurs to award-winning professionals are invited to submit work from diverse genres including reportage, art, commercial, historical and more.

Hafu Screening

According to the Japanese government, one in forty-nine babies born in Japan today have one non-Japanese parent. This newly emerging minority in Japan is under-documented and under-explored in both literature and media.

The word hafu (ハーフ) is used in Japanese to refer to somebody who is biracial (ethnically half Japanese). This documentary film follows the lives of five “hafus” as they explore what it means to be multiracial and multicultural in a nation that once proudly proclaimed itself as a mono-ethnic nation.

For some Japan is the only home they know, for some living in Japan is an entirely new experience, and others are caught somewhere between two different worlds. This film touches on race, diversity, multiculturalism, nationality, and identity.

What does it mean to be hafu? What does it mean to be Japanese? And what does all of this mean for Japan?

Schedule:

7:00 pm – 8:30 pm      Screening (will start exactly at 7pm!)
8:30 pm – 9:00 pm      Q&A with Director Megumi Nishikura

Purchase tickets here!

 Presented by:

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